The Power of Sharing What You Know By: Jim Rohn

June 15th, 2016

Sharing makes you bigger than you are. The more you pour out, the more life will be able to pour in. The key to make your life really unique and worthwhile is to share what you know, because sharing has a certain unique magic of its own. If you share an idea with 10 different people, they get to hear it once and you get to hear it 10 times—getting you even better prepared for the future. Share ideas with your family, with the people around you, with other employees, with your colleagues. If you share with someone else, they could be transformed. You may have dropped in at the right time—this may be their moment, the moment the door will open and there's opportunity they never saw before.

 

But here’s what else is exciting: The person who speaks could be transformed, too. Because guess what, we're all looking for transformation for our new life—the new life tomorrow, this month, this year, next year. One day the caterpillar says, "I think I was made for more than this crawling on the ground." So the caterpillar climbs the tree, attaches himself to a leaf and spins the cocoon. Who knows what disciplined effort it takes to spin a cocoon. But something inside the caterpillar says, "I was designed for something more than being just a caterpillar."

 

I'm asking you to go through such a metamorphosis—to go through a period where you say, "New skills, new things are waiting for me." And part of this will come if you'll translate for other people what you feel in your heart—as awkward as it might be at first, don't hesitate to do it. Because sharing makes room for more. If a glass is full of water, can it hold any more? The answer is yes. Yes—if you pour some out. If you want more, you've got to pour out what you have, and then you have the opportunity to receive more. Now, unlike the glass that remains the same size when you pour some out, not so with human beings. Your capacity will increase the more you share. You'll get bigger and bigger and bigger.

 

Why the self-interest wish to be bigger? Here’s why: to hold more of the next experience. Some people can't hold much happiness because they're too small—their thinking is too small, their activity is too small. They're too small in their ability to share. They're just too small.

 

But the bigger you get, the more you will receive. When happiness is poured out, you'll get more. When joy is poured out, you'll get more. When bounty is poured out, you will get more. If you share what you have and become bigger.

 

 

Narcissism in Leadership

June 15th, 2016

 

Leaders who show signs of narcissism but won't admit them and seek help have doomed themselves to failure.

Ancient Greek mythology offers an important lesson for anyone in any leadership position. As one fable goes, Narcissus was a beautiful hunter. As a boy his face looked as if it were chiseled from the purest marble. His beauty attracted others to him but he could never let anyone get close even though they tried to extend their love to him. He resisted because he had found another love.

 

One day at age 16 as he walked along the mythical river Styx, he stopped to sip water from a calm pool. As he knelt, the image he saw in the pool transfixed him. He immediately discovered his new love, the image of himself. His obsession with his own image kept him from giving or receiving love from others. The story says that because he could not bear to leave his reflection, he lay down by the pool and pined away for himself. Eventually the earth absorbed him and he became the flower narcissus. Thus, the word narcissist came to mean a person who has a fixation with himself.

 

What are some indicators that a pastor or a leader may be a narcissist? And what are the dangers to his or her ministry and family?

Peter Steinki, a prolific author and consultant, has worked with hundreds of leaders in the last 40 years. He once worked with 65 pastors who had affairs and found that narcissism lay at the root of most of those failures. These pastors’ need for others to value them and their need to feel important led them to sexualize their desires. Their narcissistic tendencies led them to moral failure.

 

Based upon the insight of others like Steinki, If a leader shows signs of narcissism and doesn’t admit them and seek help, he has doomed himself to failure. The narcissistic leader lives with an inflated sense of self-importance and an insatiable drive to be liked and to be at the center of attention. A narcissistic leader will create a false self to cover his fear of humiliation. Exposure to the real person is anathema to him. Steinki says that a narcissistic leader’s drive to avoid disclosure often results in these kinds of behavior:

 

1. Rage if he experiences shame for shame exposes his true self.
2. An inordinate need for praise in order to feel important.
3. The feeling of entitlement to special treatment.
4. The immense need for continual feedback of how important she is.
5. The feeling of superiority and its reinforcement from others.
6. Strong reaction to rejection and disapproval, sometimes with intense rage.
7. The lack of the capacity to mourn, a defense against depression.
8. Calculating and conniving behavior to “maintain” supplies of continuous adulation.
9. An impaired capacity for commitment.
10. No capacity for self-focus or self-examination.

 

 

Leaders are often in the limelight and get kudos and compliments from others that feed their egos. In the past two decades it seems that annually some well-known leader commits adultery or fails in some public moral way, often rooted in narcissistic tendencies. Unfortunately, narcissists often exude qualities we laud: self-confidence, a magnetic personality, strong platform skills, and the ability to motivate others. Narcissism is deadly. Be on the ware for pride and for humility.

Narcissism in Leadership

June 15th, 2016

 

Leaders who show signs of narcissism but won't admit them and seek help have doomed themselves to failure.

Ancient Greek mythology offers an important lesson for anyone in any leadership position. As one fable goes, Narcissus was a beautiful hunter. As a boy his face looked as if it were chiseled from the purest marble. His beauty attracted others to him but he could never let anyone get close even though they tried to extend their love to him. He resisted because he had found another love.

 

One day at age 16 as he walked along the mythical river Styx, he stopped to sip water from a calm pool. As he knelt, the image he saw in the pool transfixed him. He immediately discovered his new love, the image of himself. His obsession with his own image kept him from giving or receiving love from others. The story says that because he could not bear to leave his reflection, he lay down by the pool and pined away for himself. Eventually the earth absorbed him and he became the flower narcissus. Thus, the word narcissist came to mean a person who has a fixation with himself.

 

What are some indicators that a pastor or a leader may be a narcissist? And what are the dangers to his or her ministry and family?

Peter Steinki, a prolific author and consultant, has worked with hundreds of leaders in the last 40 years. He once worked with 65 pastors who had affairs and found that narcissism lay at the root of most of those failures. These pastors’ need for others to value them and their need to feel important led them to sexualize their desires. Their narcissistic tendencies led them to moral failure.

 

Based upon the insight of others like Steinki, If a leader shows signs of narcissism and doesn’t admit them and seek help, he has doomed himself to failure. The narcissistic leader lives with an inflated sense of self-importance and an insatiable drive to be liked and to be at the center of attention. A narcissistic leader will create a false self to cover his fear of humiliation. Exposure to the real person is anathema to him. Steinki says that a narcissistic leader’s drive to avoid disclosure often results in these kinds of behavior:

 

1. Rage if he experiences shame for shame exposes his true self.
2. An inordinate need for praise in order to feel important.
3. The feeling of entitlement to special treatment.
4. The immense need for continual feedback of how important she is.
5. The feeling of superiority and its reinforcement from others.
6. Strong reaction to rejection and disapproval, sometimes with intense rage.
7. The lack of the capacity to mourn, a defense against depression.
8. Calculating and conniving behavior to “maintain” supplies of continuous adulation.
9. An impaired capacity for commitment.
10. No capacity for self-focus or self-examination.

 

 

Leaders are often in the limelight and get kudos and compliments from others that feed their egos. In the past two decades it seems that annually some well-known leader commits adultery or fails in some public moral way, often rooted in narcissistic tendencies. Unfortunately, narcissists often exude qualities we laud: self-confidence, a magnetic personality, strong platform skills, and the ability to motivate others. Narcissism is deadly. Be on the ware for pride and for humility.

Delinquencies Spike Among Amortizing HELOCs

June 15th, 2016

Second-lien home equity lines of credit (HELOCs) have experienced year-over-year delinquency rate increases in two of the past six months, the first such increases in nearly four years (since June 2012), according to data released by Black Knight Financial Services on Monday. With a few million more HELOCs set to amortize over the next couple of years, there will likely be plenty of refinancing opportunities as homeowners look for a way to handle the higher payments they are facing.

 

According to the April 2016 Mortgage Monitor, the increases were largely driven by an 87 percent spike in the number of delinquencies among 2005-vintage HELOCs that began amortizing in 2015 at their 10-year end-of-draw period. Heading into 2015, the 2005-vintage HELOCs made up about 17 percent of all active HELOCs in the United States. “Due to the large volumes in the 2005 vintage, those delinquencies are more noticeably impacting overall year-over-year HELOC delinquency figures, whereas up until six months ago, improved performance of other vintages had been sufficient to mask delinquency rate increases of vintages experiencing draw period expirations,” Black Knight reported.

 

According to Black Knight, the trend of rising delinquencies among HELOCs is likely to continue in the next couple of years, since HELOCs with a 2006 vintage—totaling about 1.25 million—began amortizing this year and accounted for 17 percent of all active HELOCS. HELOCs with a 2007 vintage currently account for about 18 percent of all active HELOCs. The delinquency rates among 2006-vintage HELOCs already appears to be increasing, having crept up by 5 basis points over the first quarter of 2016, according to Black Knight.

 

There is a chance that HELOCs amortizing over the next year or two might take advantage of the low interest rate environment to refinance when they reach the expiration of their 10-year draw periods. The prepayment activity among 2006-vintage HELOCs has been higher in the last 12 months than what the 2005-vintage HELOCs have experienced, and the 2007-vintage HELOCs may similarly benefit from low interest rates, Black Knight reported.

 

 

Some 2006-vintage HELOCs may have difficulty refinancing due to larger balances and higher negative equity rates, which equate to larger payment shocks. Over the past two years, approximately 30 percent of HELOCs reaching the end of their draw period were either paid off or refinanced. Whereas 2005-vintage HELOCs made up 17 percent of all active HELOCs at the beginning of 2015, that percentage shrank to 13 percent by the beginning of 2016.

One Percent of World's Population Holds Almost half its Wealth

June 15th, 2016

Just one percent of the world's population can call themselves millionaires or richer. But together they hold almost half the world's wealth, and their share is growing, according to a new study released Tuesday. Some 18.5 million households around the world have at least 1 million worth of assets, for a total of 78.8 trillion -- or about the same size as global annual economic output -- Boston Consulting Group's annual report on global private wealth says.

 

That also amounts to 47 percent of total global wealth -- based on holdings of cash, financial accounts, and equities, but not real estate -- leaving the rest to be divided by the other 99 percent of the world's population. The elite one percent have steadily grown their share of global wealth from 45 percent in 2013 to 47 percent last year, the findings show, supporting worries among economists that inequality is growing around the globe. The United States tops the world's count of millionaires by far, with eight million at least that wealthy, followed by China with two million millionaires and Japan with half that number.

 

Per capita, however, the largest concentrations of wealthy are in the tax havens of Liechtenstein and Switzerland. But overall wealth has grown fastest in the Asia-Pacific region, thanks to East Asia's booming economies, at a rate of 12.3 percent annually over the past five years and with forecasts it will grow more than 10 percent a year to 2020. Excluding Japan, the Asia-Pacific region will account for more than 40 percent of global wealth growth over the coming half-decade, the report said. Most of that will be in China and India. "The Asia-Pacific region is also expected to surpass Western Europe as the second wealthiest region in 2017," it added.

 

Despite efforts by the United States and European countries to crack down on tax evasion, the report said, offshore financial centers remain important to the world's wealthy. Offshore tax havens hold some 10 trillion, an amount that grew around 3 percent last year. The largest sources of wealth held offshore are Latin America and the Middle East. "In these regions economic and political tensions... have continued to contribute to the flow of wealth offshore," the report said.

 

And while Switzerland remains the world's main destination for parking offshore money, both Singapore and Hong Kong are growing much faster in the business, with around 18 percent of the world's offshore wealth.